How Continuing Care Programs Support Recovery

It’s not easy to admit you may have a problem. But for those courageous individuals who decide to seek treatment for either a behavioral health concern or an addiction, the road to recovery is only the first step in their journey.

Seeking Treatment for Mental Health and Addiction Concerns

Seeking treatment for any mental health concern or addiction is a brave and often bold step for an individual to make.

A 2017 national survey from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) found that of the more than 20 million people age 12 and older who were classified as needing treatment for a substance use disorder, only 4 million, or 19%, sought care. Similarly, of the more than 18 million people who needed but didn’t receive treatment for an addiction, only 5.7% felt they needed treatment.

It’s not easy to admit you may have a problem. But for those courageous individuals who decide to seek treatment for either a behavioral health concern or an addiction, the road to recovery is only the first step in their journey.

How Long-Term Treatment Can Prevent Relapse

Treatment for mental health concerns or addictions generally isn’t a cure, but rather a systematic approach to successfully managing an illness that involves changing behaviors over a period of time. In some programs, such as detox, a patient may only be present at an inpatient facility for three days. That’s not a realistic window of time for a person to completely kick the habits and behaviors of using the substance they’ve become addicted to. It’s critical for sustained success in recovery that a patient participates in aftercare, or step-down treatment.

A 2017 National Health Service study tracked 439 patients in the United Kingdom who were considered to have recovered from either the depression or anxiety symptoms they sought treatment for. Of those, 53% displayed clinical symptoms of a relapse within a year after completing psychological treatment. That relapse rate is similar to the one for patients who finish treatment for substance use disorders, which has repeatedly been estimated to be between 40% and 60%.

Options for Continuing Care

There are a variety of options for continuing care within the Acadia Healthcare network for individuals who have completed residential or inpatient treatment. For someone who is struggling with alcohol use disorder, a sober living facility or halfway house may be the right step-down option. For a variety of mental health concerns and substance use disorders, a partial hospitalization program (PHP) or intensive outpatient program (IOP) might be the correct choice. For those who require less intensive follow-up care, a weekly therapist visit or a monthly support group meeting could do the trick.

Aftercare Preparation and Planning

Regardless of the level of step-down care you or a loved one needs, it’s vital to have a plan in place for the moment treatment is complete. Our Treatment Placement Specialists® team pays meticulous attention to your unique recovery needs from the moment of first contact, and we continue with that level of detail upon the conclusion of residential or inpatient treatment. The TPS team stays in contact with and works alongside both referring professionals and clients once they finish their treatment cycle.

Recovery is a lifelong journey, and, for those who have struggled with a mental health concern or an addiction, relapse is often a part of that path. It’s nothing to be ashamed of. But by seeking appropriate step-down care after treatment is complete, you can reduce your risk of relapse and increase your chances of a healthier, brighter future.

Marks of Quality Care
  • FBI National Academy Associates
  • Higher Education Case Management Association (HECMA)
  • National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI)
  • National Association of Addiction Treatment Providers (NAATP)
  • The Joint Commission (JCAHO) Gold Seal of Approval
  • The Jason Foundation